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How I pack a Treadle Sewing Machine

 

This machine is an absolutely gorgeous Singer Improved Family 15 originally purchased in France, brought to Canada and now being packed and shipped to Santa Cruz, California. It is being packed and shipped "ground/surface" insured through the post office.

Before we get started here is a couple images of treadle. I'm not going to go into the disassembly process here in this document other than to mention a few important areas as it pertains to packing and making the customers life a whole lot easier on the receiving end. In total, there are 6 cartons and an envelope being shipped. If you've read any of the other webpages in this series, you will know I prefer using white styrofoam in all my sewing machine packing because it's sturdy, relatively inexpensive, and is lightweight.

 

The Treadle Frame

I think the best thing I can do here is suggest you look at each image. Packing a treadle sewing machine is a huge job which requires a good deal of thought. I'll comment on each image as required.

1-cutting 2" styrofoam to fit cast end

2-sytrofoam cut for both treadle ends

3-soft foam for protection of cast

4-using cardboard & foam between cast ends

5-2nd cast end inserted in packaging

6-package completed

The important thing with packaging items such as this is you have to protect the cast metal from heavy blows or rough treatment in shipping. Cast iron is very brittle, and will break if not protected sufficiently.

Center Brace

7-center brace ready to cut styrfoam

8-insert cut ready for part

9-center brace inserted

10-ready for cardboard

11-cardboard protection (edge)

12-ready to ship

Same as above, protect it well.

The Top

13-wood top laid out on styro

14-protect with cardboard

15-wrapped ready to ship

I use a lot of fiberglass tape. Bind everything up tight with this type tape to prevent parts and/or packaging from coming loose or falling apart.

The Flywheel

Nothing much different here.

16-prepare to pack

17-styrofoam cut out & pitman protected

18-more protection

19-packing in carton

20-ready to ship

Miscellaneous

20-drawer

21- preparing box top

22-line the box for support & fill

23-protect with cardboard and saran wrap

24-ready to ship

As you see in the above images, I fill the void inside the drawer and box top. I do this to prevent crushing: without this there is a possibility of outside forces collapsing items such as this. Also, make sure you package all the little parts and pieces in separate packages. I use zip lock parts bags and mark each bag with item contents and where they came from.

The Head

25-this is how I begin

26-styrofoam cutout for protection

27-base of head protected

28-head in shipping carton

29-ready for shipment

Every sewing machine head requires you pay special attention to packing. It is very important to protect and ensure the all mechanical components are NEVER allowed to support any significant weight. You'll notice in the above images that the weight is being supported by the sewing bed and the styrofoam has been cut out so the hook & bobbin assembly is literally suspended in mid-air and not touching any packing whatsoever.

Labels & Shipping

30-carton address labels and shipping info

31-in truck delivered to post office

Six cartons in total, all labeled with shipping and return address. As an extra precaution, each carton also has a shipping pouch with important information contained inside.

I share this information with you from my own personal experience. I've shipped many treadle sewing machines. Good luck, and remember "no sale is complete until your customer receives the merchandise in good condition and they are 100% satisfied.

Please feel free to direct any parties involved in packing a sewing machine to this packing series.

Thank you,
Bob Bannen, former owner of sew2go

Back To "Packing Series Home"

   

 

 Home
Invention of the Sewing Machine ~ Canadian Sewing Machine Manufacturers
Sewing Machine Values ~ Singer Dates ~ Willcox & Gibbs Dates ~ Needle Threading
Shuttle Identification ~ Common Problems ~ Why Make Quilts? ~ Sewing With Children
Packing a Sewing Machine ~ Paint a Featherweight ~ Favorites and Links

 

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